This fall, pull your friends together and talk about the fun you’ve had with Girl Scouts! Over coffee, dessert, or even a girls’ night out, invite a friend to be a role model for girls by volunteering with Girl Scouts. If you’re one of the first 500 current Girl Scout volunteers to invite a friend to join Girl Scouts as a new troop leader or assistant troop leader for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors (kindergarteners through fifth graders), you’ll receive a wonderful Girl Scout prize pack of your choice.

Click here to download the “Invite a Friend” flier for more details.

Who should I invite to be a troop leader?

You can invite anyone over the age of 18 who you think would be a good troop leader. Think of those you know who would really enjoy working with and mentoring girls. Who do you know works with their child’s booster clubs (band, theatre, sports, etc.)? Who do you know works with youth in your place of worship? Don’t forget your friends whose children are grown or away at college. Who do you know that doesn’t have girls or doesn’t have any children at all, and would still be a great mentor? People without children make really amazing Girl Scout leaders. Who do you know would love to play a very real, very important role in shaping the future of our country by helping to develop the next generation of female leaders?

How should I ask my friend?

The invite for this Invite a Friend campaign should be personal and informal. Ask your friend to lunch or to your favorite coffee shop. You can post an invitation on Facebook or make your own invitation if you want to open this up to a several friends at once.

Can I present this to other clubs I belong to?

Yes, of course! Do you belong to a running or gardening club? Think about using an activity you already share with your friend, as a way to connect and share your Girl Scout story. Use this friendly get together to set the stage for a comfortable, no pressure conversation for both of you.

Can a male be a troop leader?

Yes, we do allow men to be troop leaders. As always, we follow the GSHCC procedure that each troop must have at least two unrelated adult troop leaders, not living in the same household, one of which is female.

What do I say to invite my friend to become a troop leader?

Take a moment to think about all of the girls that you mentor—then share your story. Think about how you are changing their lives and their future. Girl Scouts helps create the most successful women leaders in this nation. What we do is significant—it matters to each and every girl we serve. Share the great times you’ve had with your troop, with your best friend, sister, or co-worker. Laugh at yourself and tell the tale of the outdoor cooking experiment gone awry. Bring the tissues and re-live the moment when the shyest Brownie boldly asked, “Would you like to buy some Girl Scout cookies?” Be proud and show the picture of the troop that just completed their Bronze Award. Tailor your story so that it makes a connection with your friend— speak from the heart. Share your story with your friend and ask her or him to become a Girl Scout troop leader.

Can my friend be the co-leader of my troop?

If you are need of a co-leader, they certainly can. There are many girls on the placement list waiting to be in Girl Scouts so we would love to have troop leaders that would also like to start new troops.

Do I need to bring the Volunteer Application to our get together?

It would be great if you can, so please email us at volunteer@girlscoutshcc.org to get applications and other recruitment materials. Or you can find the application on our website www.girlscoutshcc.org.

What’s next?

Have your friend email the application to volunteer@girlscoutshcc.org or mail to GSHCC, 6601 Elvas Ave., Sacramento, 95819. Then, complete the survey found on the email you received on 10/17/13 to get a prize pack from GSUSA.

What’s next for my friend after the application is submitted?

GSHCC staff will follow up with the newly invited troop leader to make sure they are supported and successful in starting a new troop or becoming an assistant leader in an existing troop.